Perspective

Ghosts of Christmas Past

There is a pair of clichés about the Christmas season that carries more significance than we might think: “Christmas is for children” and “Christmas makes me feel like a kid again.

The first refers to a certain innocence we envy in the children around us, who seem to really believe in Santa, magic, and the world of fairies, and who instinctively love Christmas. For us, Christmas has become both expensive and cheap: the over-planned parties and schedules . . . the chore of buying gifts that will be quickly forgotten, disposed of, or re-gifted . . . the trudging through horrible, muzak-filled malls. . . “Becoming a kid again,” at least for a time, is our redemption.

And it’s a very real feeling. Entering the world of adults is, among other things, entering a world that is incessantly moving forward. Our lives are defined by projects, goals, accomplishments, deadlines, etc. Christmas, on the other hand, is an Eternal Return, a natural cycle that gives us a respite from linear thinking and planning.

We experience this Return not only through the season itself (when the nights become long and cold) but also through ritual. Ritual is something modern people, even devout Christians, are too quick to dismiss. Ritual is, we think, a dispensable, even embarrassing, remnant of something irrational from long ago. But ritual is, among other things, a way we can physically experience being-in-the-world and our own past. We remember through our bodies and senses just as much as through our minds, such as when we visit our old high school and whiff a certain smell to the grass that recalls the entire experience. Every Christmas, we do the same things over and over: drink the same drinks, hang the same decorations, hear the same music. In reenactment, we are transported back to a series of moments earlier in our lives. We become “a kid again.”

These memory-experiences are mostly postcard flashes. Every Christmas Eve, for instance, as I glance at lights on the tree and the too-dark sky, I re-live waiting, greedily, for Santa. Another flash, which is still quite vivid, comes from age seven or eight, as I lay in bed feeling real guilt and inner turmoil over wanting to believe in Santa Claus but no longer being able. Smelling hot-spiced wine, “Glühwein,” I’m reminded of wandering the streets of Vienna in December as a young man in my early 20s, hearing the sounds of the Christmas market in the distance . . . observing it, while not really being a part of it . . . and not having a clue what to do with my life.

“Bob’s eggnog recipe” or your favorite “Christmas sweater” might seem like recurring jokes. But in their ways, they fulfill the function of grand ritual. And this aspect of Christmas holds not only for our personal lives but for our people and civilization as well. We have become so accustomed to Christmas rituals—and so accustomed to them in the form of kitsch—that we forget how deep they take us into our race’s history . . . far deeper than what the holiday is said to celebrate. For the rituals through which we understand ourselves are fundamentally Pagan in both essence and form.

The Conversion

In his famous book The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity, James Russell wrote of a “double conversion” that occurred when the early Church began spreading beyond the Mediterranean and Near East and sought to bring “the Germans” (i.e., the northern European tribes) into the Christian fold. At the time, these Europeans practiced what is now referred to as Germanic Paganism, a constellation of myths, gods, and symbols that was, at once, centered on the tribe and family and also shared by White men across the continent. Europeans did, eventually, profess Christianity, but the real “conversion” was that of Christianity itself, which both accommodated Europeans folkways and began to be articulated by them.

This process occurred on various cultural levels, from the Europeanized image and conception of Christ to notions of Right and sovereignty. The mix of Germanic, Scandinavian, and Roman customs that define “Christmas” is a metaphor of this history. For Christmas remains the most radically Pagan of all holidays, if we have the eyes to see it.

This begins with the day itself. Nowhere in the Bible does December 25 appear as the birth date of Jesus Christ. (If the shepherds were attending their flocks by night (Luke 2:8), then Jesus would have been born in Spring.) December 25 was, however, well known as the birthday of Sol Invictus, the sun god who was patronized by later Roman emperors, including Constantine. The 25th was Dies Natalis Solis Invicti—”Birthday of the Unconquered Sun,” when, after the Winter Solstice, the arc of the Sun across the sky begins to rise again. The famous literary pun of “Son” and “Sun,” which works across Germanic languages, was a real experience of our ancestors. “Now is the winter of our discontent / Made glorious summer by this sun of York” (I, i, 1-2). Hamlet, by contrast, sardonically claims that he is “too much i’ the sun” (I, ii, 67). His rightful inheritance has been snatched away from him through treachery, and he wonders whether he up to the task of taking it back . . . a feeling shared by many of us.[1]

Thinking in the way, the meanings of things we take for granted unlock themselves before our eyes: the evergreen (the endless life cycle) . . . the Yule log (festival of fire) . . . kissing under the Mistletoe (the sacred plant of Frigg, goddess of love, fertility, and the household) . . . and, of course, Santa. “St. Nick” is only remotely related to Saint Nicholas, a Church father at the Council of Nicaea whose feast day falls on December sixth. The character of Santa is much more a conflation of various Germanic gods and personages. One of these, as evidenced by Santa’s descent into the fiery chimney, is the smithy god Hephaistos or Vulcan. (In other words, “The Church Lady,” and many puritans before her, was right to fear that Santa has an etymological connection to S-a-t-a-n.) Most important of all is the chief god, Odin or Wotan, who stares out at us from behind Santa’s many historical masks—from Father Frost (Ded Moroz), the Slavic god accepted by Russian Communists, to the jolly fat man promoted by Coca Cola. Odin is the Wanderer from the North, a god of war, but one who delivers gifts to children during Yuletide. Odin commands Sleipnir, the horse with eight legs, who, in his translation to contemporary myth, became the eight reindeer: Dasher! now, Dancer! now, Prancer and Vixen! On, Comet! on Cupid! on, Donder and Blitzen!

The War on What?

A few years back, Megyn Kelly, then a Fox News host, was roundly ridiculed and condemned after she declared on national television that “Santa just is White” (along with Jesus). She affirmed this in response to an African-American blogger who argued for more multiracial depictions of Santa, or for him to be racially neutralized as a friendly Penguin. Santa, as we can know, is White, but in ways that Megyn is unable to understand.

The amusing “White Santa” controversy was only one variation on a theme. Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, Fox’s programming is packed with denunciations of the “War on Christmas”; these are made, almost without exception, by conservative Republicans and nationalists, who seem to define their identity against an ever-growing list of PC atrocities.

Like so many other “conservative” causes, opposing the War on Christmas masks much more than it reveals. To begin with, focusing on “secularization,” exemplified by the dreaded “Happy Holidays” greetings, is convenient for Americans who want to ignore the ways Christmas rituals are being vulgarized by consumerism. Apparently, maxing out our credit cards on useless junk is fine, so long as the checkout girl says “Merry Christmas” and the indoor mall features a nativity scene.

Those who lament the “war on Christmas” rarely pinpoint what exactly is being warred upon. Undoubtedly, there is an elite in the United States and Europe that has contempt for Christian belief. But this effort has not led to any decline in public festivals and holiday merrymaking. The Bolshevik or Puritanical dream of “banning Christmas” in favor of grey-on-grey efficiency or de-Paganized Christianity has very few advocates and little chance of materializing. In my lifetime, the Christmas season has grown noticeably longer and public and private festivals, more elaborate and intense. To be sure, much of this has to do with the fact that America’s post-industrial, consumer-driven economy depends on end-of-the-year gorging. But I also sense that something bigger is taking place—that in a multicultural, multiracial society, Christmas, alongside football and super-hero movies, is one of the preious few collective rituals shared by all of us.

Glimpsing The Gods

Christmas is being de-Christianized, the result not only of snooty liberals but of the gradual waning of faith across the population as a whole. What remain, though, are the Germanic, Latin, and Slavic customs and rituals of Yuletide. These might seem vulgar, hallow shells of themselves—Christmas kitsch—but they are distinctly European and distinctly ours. And they are a starting point for becoming, again, who we are.

In the small ski town in which I spend celebrate the holiday, every Christmas Eve, everyone goes to the base of the mountain and watches skiers descend the slopes holding flaming torches, which creates a magnificent display of lights. At the end of the parade comes Santa, illuminated like a god.

As I mentioned, one of my stranger Christmas memories is of struggling with my failing faith in Santa, as if in disbelieving in him, I would betray my parents and family and the whole joyous season. But what is belief, really? When we honor Santa by speaking of his coming, when we leave him offerings of cookies and milk, we effectively believe again in the gods. When we celebrate Christmas, we become Pagans again.

For the time being, though, we know not what we do.

An earlier version of this essay was published at RadixJoural.com on December 25, 2013.


[1]: This opening line from Richard III references the turning of the seasons, of course, but also Edward IV’s identity as the son of the Duke of York and his victory at the battle of Mortimer’s Cross on February 2, 1461, in which, it is said, three suns appeared in the winter sky. Essentially, Edward is a man called on by the world itself to rule. Hamlet is speaking to his uncle, Claudius, who’s just become both King and his father through marriage to his widowed mother.

Richard Spencer
the authorRichard Spencer
Richard Spencer is American Editor of AltRight.com; he's President of The National Policy Institute and founder of RadixJournal.com.

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59 Comments on "Ghosts of Christmas Past"

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_OMM_0910_
Guest
Beautifully written article. The Yuletide traditions will remain strong, for consumer’s sake’s……which is, at least, a wonderful ancillary effect. The Christmas kitsch aspects, to me, are what makes Christmas the Eternal Return. For many there was never a reverence for Christian deity. It was Saint Nick and the Yuletide rituals that made it magical. These rituals are distinctly European. And it’s wonderful that some of the more obscure traditions (e.g., Krampus) are becoming trendy. Having popular culture embrace historic European traditions, even if only in a shallow and fleeting sort of way, is IMO a welcomed departure from the usual… Read more »
BlondeGingerSaxon
Guest

This was a beautiful piece and exemplifies the tone that we “pagans”/Asatruar/Rodnovery/etc try to exemplify in our messages all the time: that our basis is our own, that our gods are native to us, and everything great about our people comes from inside, from an inner potential and ancestral spirit that needs tapped in to.

bob
Guest

Christmas is celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ. As long as you know that, everything else is irrelevant.

Guy White
Guest

In re Paganism; Christianization of Scandinavia began in the Ninth Century, after 800 CE, and before Woden gave men the Runes to record their Pagan rites and rituals.

Is there any Paganist literature not corrupted by the Romans, or is modern Paganism just an reaction to Roman Christianization influence? Is there any honest ab origin paganism?

Green
Guest

The oldest know rune scriptures were written down 1800 years ago, but the oldest written books and letters are a thousand years younger written in latin letters by christian monks. Many of the sagas are handwritten copies of each other. By comparing them you get closer to the oral tradition that existed before Christianity.

Green
Guest

>Many of the sagas are handwritten copies of each other
More precisely: Many of the sources contain the same sagas and poems, and some of them are handwritten copies of each other.

Ferox M
Guest

Incredibly good article. I can’t agree more. Spencer is the most clear thinking intelectual of the AltRight.

SelousScout
Plus Member

Thanks for writing. Happy Christmas and Hail Victory to you all!

Guy White
Guest

Book recommendations.

Tree of Salvation: Yggdrasil and the Cross in the North (Oxford, 2013) by G. Ronald Murphy S. J.

Heliand: The Saxon Gospel (Oxford, 1992) by G. Ronald Murphy S.J.

There may be a call for another Reformation to take our White Christian Church from the Roman church influence. Martin Luther had a copy of Heliand (Norse, Savior) and wrote on it.

SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member

Thanks!

Nova Morium
Guest

‘O Holy Night’

The Choir of King’s College, Cambridge

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdMSPhtSiEQ

Absolutely Beautiful……….

Nova Morium
Guest

Richard needs to Write more……

This was a Great Read…….

As an Atheist, I still love Christmas (minus the Consumerism)……….

All the Decorations, Lights, Ornamented Tree, Historical Music, Food, Family, and sometimes even Gift Giving……..

It Strikes a Chord with something Very Deep inside me…….

It feels Good, Man!!…….

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!

anna
Guest

As a Atheist you’re right on point this holiday has nothing to do with Yahuwah it’s the Christian’s who are out of place worshipping the god of Saturnalia .

Krafty Wurker
Guest
The Germanics were converted to a form of Christianity by Arian Christian missionaries, and the Germanics remained Arians’ for about 400 to 500 years before they were absorbed into the Roman Church. Arianism is at odds with the Roman Catholic Trinitarian beliefs, as taught most notably by the Irish Roman Catholics, and to a lesser extent by the Italians in the USA. When you read the New Testament Jesus says, in numerous passages that he is subordinate to the Father, right down to his death on the cross. In my opinion it’s not a big issue, but, it should be… Read more »
Ferox M
Guest

Clearly north and south Europeans have very close but different ways of understanding the world. Which is ok, we are brothers but not the same. As Southern European I feel the same way. That said, Europe is being taken by foreigners and in time of need, brothers stick together.

Diversity+Heretic
Guest
As I recall, the practical problem with Arianism is that if God the Father could send His son one time, why couldn’t he send Him again? Could God the Father beget other sons? How do you refute someone claiming to be the Son of God, if either of the above propositions is true? Making God the Son the absolute coequal of God the Father, and God the Holy Spirit sort of solves the problem. Another factor was that the Goths wanted to be Christian but they wanted to be different Christians than the Franks. Adhering to Arianism also solved that… Read more »
anna
Guest

No need to send Jesus again the first time He stated It Is Finished. He paid the price for sin and all to Him I owe death had left a crimson stain He washed it white as snow. It’s a done deal. The first time He came was to be a sacrifice ohhh but the second coming He’s coming as KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS YAHUWAH IN THE HIGHESTGLORY TODAY IS THE DAY OF SALVATION COME TO JESUS NOW PEACE UNTO YOU!!!

Krafty Wurker
Guest

Good questions. It surely didn’t solve it for St. John or any of the Evangelists who touched on it.

CBH
Guest

Very nice essay. Merry Christmas.

MourningSkyfire
Guest
I appreciate this article deeply. These spiritual cycles you are talking about, celebrating life and the seasons, and freeing the heart to allow men feel awe at the world around him again. . . I think we are just beginning to reclaim divinity in the world around us. It started with an existential catastrophe, sure. We have undergone a change due to that. When we saw the natural world as “creation” rather than divinity itself , we effectively de-deified it. Then, when scholars after the enligthenment reasoned the absurdity of “creation” in Christian parlance, the world around us became “resource”,… Read more »
Steve_15
Guest

If anything destroys the Alt-Right it will be the ridiculous new-age pagan LARPers who are trying to rewrite paganism into some kind of “noble White religion” instead of what it really was — a bizarre hodgepodge of degenerate barbarian cults.

Pagan LARPers are an embarrassing blight on the White race.

And they certainly need to be purged from the Alt-Right.

Green
Guest

What do you want to purge? The Greek myths? Hundreds of years of literature inspired by them? Pagan religions might not be sophisticated in your eyes, but the pagan myths are part of our culture and history and we have all the right reasons to be proud of it and to celebrate it.

anna
Guest
Well said let each man choose this day whom he will serve the gods of your fathers so be it as for me and my house we will serve Yahuwah knowing the origin of a thing is of grave importance more so for the Christian than for those who are not. Those who are not can flow any way the wind blows from one idol or god or tradition the list is endless yet for the believe you are called to a narrower road for broad is the road that leads to well you know where and many therein follow… Read more »
SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member

Ha, you try to sew division to “save” the alt right? If you’re really so unaware, go over to Counter-Currents and read some of the things they publish, such as “What Is a Rune?”.
Out of curiosity, what are you? A Christian?

Hipster Racist
Guest

Pagan LARPing would be awfully cringe, but other than a handful of Europeans, I’ve never actually seen many. If anything, it’s both the “Nazis” and the various “Trad Catholics” that are the guiltiest of LARPing.

anna
Guest
And the real culprit has still remain hidden his diabolical plan moves forward unhindered for he has deceived and shut the eyes and minds of men. So as to turn them away from the true and living Father Yahuwah to the imposter who poses as an angel of light with fake ministers of righteousness everything from pedigree to social standing to wealth standing you name it we’ll boast in it as if we control anything the very breath we breathe has an expiration date we are so pitiful spiritual hobo’s you brought nothing into this world and won’t take anything… Read more »
grant
Guest

are you a puritan?

Ferox M
Guest

Semitic influence in the house. Sad.

Craicher
Guest

Santa Claus is the Americanization of Saint Nicholas and NOT Odin. That is fantasy and sounds like the Blacks claiming the Egyptians were nogs. The reindeer story likewise. That is NOT an old European tale but some 20th c. American fakery.

Make believe fairy tale history only harm our cause.

God Jul.

SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member

St. Nicholas being attached to the still pre-American image of gift-giver/person you bribe to leave you alone was intentional and, yes, connected to pagan beliefs. Its all quite apocryphal though, so such autism will only give you a headache. Stick to memorizing pi or something.

Craicher
Guest

I am talking about history and historians. Let’s stick to credible things please. It would do us good. I am not attacking paganism and understand quite well the pagan origins of Jul and have no problem with it whatsoever. But make believe history is just plain dumb!

God Jul.

SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member
Fair, but I think there is a third way, beyond just “this or that was or was not appropriated from pagan traditions/spirituality.” The pagan-inclined can, within certain limits, read their paganism into history and their lives as a spiritual exercise, not an historical one. A lot of pagan and shamanistic beliefs indeed come from that same process of intuiting. That kind of spiritual material, of course, should be presented as such, and not as historical fact, but we should recognize that spirituality doesn’t simply come from the tomes of history. It is quite pointless to re-litigate this particular history anyway,… Read more »
anna
Guest

I can so respect your worship of Odin at least you know you don’t serve Yahuwah I get that what is so sad to me is Christians joining in on this religious holiday Christmas thinking they are serving Yahuwah when He states clearly come out of her this modern day Babylon worship not their gods who neither speak walk talk come out. I’m alright with everybody who know they don’t worship Yahuwah at least they got sense enough to know it. Peace

anna
Guest

People perish for the lack of knowledge some are so comfy with whatever it is today feel no need to search for truth or Yahuwah for that matter sitting in church’s receiving whatever comes their way simply due mostly to laziness not dumb people just lazy. Yahuwah gave us a brain to my dear Christian sisters and brothers please use it and not all churches are bad Yahuwah was pleased with 2 of them .Just saying and I’m not sitting in judgement of anyone Christian or not. Peace

anna
Guest
Satan transforms himself into an angel of light with that comes diabolical deception which is now running rampant in our modern world this Santa when studied (Satan) his origin is rooted not with St. Nicholas but with Old Father Of Time which is rooted in the Grim Reaper with further study Baby New Year this up coming holiday. None of these things or customs have their origin in the biblical observance of the holy days of the Lunar calendar .Dec 25th is the birthday of the sun god Sol Invictus be that as it may we are all free to… Read more »
anna
Guest

You don’t have to be concern with this harming your cause paganism is at an all time high Yahuwah isn’t being sought that rapidly in the States in 3rd world countries they’re sold out on Jesus. This Christmas and Baby New Year as it’s referred to back in the day lines up perfectly with whatever doctrine you got going rest at ease you good. Peace

Diversity+Heretic
Guest

One of Richard’s best essays ever.

Gubbler+Chechenova
Guest
George Lucas was one of the Movie Brats who were greatly influenced by Westerns, esp John Ford’s THE SEARCHERS. Of course, his big success was STAR WARS, and it is in the news again. The latest installment LAST JEDI has been blasted in many quarters. Not just the Alt Right but from the fanbase. Mark Hamill himself wasn’t happy about what was made of Luke Skywalker. I haven’t seen it and don’t want to, but maybe the latest installment is really about George Lucas’ betrayal of his own destiny. Not for nothing was the hero named Luke Skywalker. Luke was… Read more »
Gubbler+Chechenova
Guest
The old STAR WARS just became greed. Those who bitch about how Disney ruined are missing the point. Lucas gave up on the vision and just pursued it as a business. I think a part of Lucas always felt a certain shame since he betrayed his destiny in following the footsteps of Ford, Kurosawa, and Coppola. So, after awhile, he didn’t even try to hide the fact that STAR WARS became just more excuse to make more money and keep Lucas relevant in the business since he gave up on his other personal projects, whatever they may have been. So,… Read more »
Gubbler+Chechenova
Guest
Blame George Lucas. He created his own vision, and good or bad, it was his. He had control over it and was associated with it. Lucas = Luke. It was like a fantasy autobiography, about being torn between fulfilling his destiny as a true artist and the temptation to just go for the money. In a way, Lucas betrayed himself and just went for the money. But in some ways, he remained true to himself because he maintained absolute control over his biggest success, STAR WARS, a personal vision and possession. And his Industrial Light and Magic did revolutionize cinema… Read more »
Julian
Guest
The old Christmas-is-Pagan canard. When will this ever die? It’s based on faulty 18th-century conjectures. Modern scholarship has relegated this thesis to the dustbin already. As the historian William J. Tighe: “The pagan feast which the Emperor Aurelian instituted on that date in the year 274 was not only an effort to use the winter solstice to make a political statement, but also almost certainly an attempt to give a pagan significance to a date already of importance to Roman Christians… Thus the ‘pagan origins of Christmas’ is a myth without historical substance.” Nationalists who are pagan or atheist should… Read more »
SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member

Not sure how this detracts from Catholic or Orthodox nationalists/nationalisms.

I Ride With Forrest
Guest
Christmas like Easter are interesting holi(y)days. Neither were practiced by the early Christians or commanded to be celebrated by scripture. I have been in the camp that they both have pagan roots for years. We did not raise our kids to believe in Santa or even have a Christmas tree for most of their years growing up. As is mentioned in the article, the attack on Christmas is a general attack on Western culture and tradition. It was one of my favorite holidays as a kid but has become the most depressing as an adult. It is so sad what… Read more »
DrBubba
Plus Member

When our people finally realize they have been duped into following a fake religion and worshipping a fake messiah (intentionally concocted, controlled-opposition (((Christianity))), then, and only then, will we again rise to prominence on this plane(t). Our Æsir gods are jealous gods and offended that we have abandoned them.

yan
Guest

Oh right…and the proof of your thesis is…that paganism caused the rise of white people “to prominence on this planet” in the first place?? Come on.

anna
Guest
Cry loud, spare not. Lift up your voice like a trumpet and declare to My people their transgression and to the house of Jacob their sins. One of the ways the enemy will try to deceive believers will be from the pulpit, not only does he transforms himself into an angel of light he places his fake ministers of righteousness in the pulpit. Those who don’t believe or obey Yahuwah are already set in satan’s camp no problem. So when you say fake religion you are right, and the true children in relationship with their Father will see it also.… Read more »
Randy
Guest

Good stuff

SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member

Who are all the people down-voting these comments. This one just says “good stuff.” Hardly inflammatory. Some trad-Catholics got their rosaries in a twist. C’mon y’all, take it easy.

Barnabas Wagner
Guest

Great article Richard.

MBNMIX
Guest

There’s an incredible depth to germanic traditions despite literal millennia of oppression. The European gods are part of our people and represent our very essence.

Krafty Wurker
Guest

The earliest documented historical contact between Christian missionaries and Germanics seems to have been between Arian Christian missionaries and the Gothic tribes north of the Danube River.

Dissident Republican
Guest

Very interesting and in-depth perspective. I enjoyed reading this.

yan
Guest
And what Catholic with any understanding of Catholicism ever condemned paganism, root and branch? And for you Christian fundamentalists who worship America: democracy was invented and first practiced by the ancient idol-worshipping Greeks and Romans! Pagans all. Plenty of good things to be found in paganism, and among pagans. But also bad things! So guys…Christianity is good. If that fact interferes with your larger political and racial ideas, take it to heart! And modify your ideas accordingly. Don’t try out paganism again. It’s on the dustbin of history, rightly so! Merry Xmas, to racists and every one of us.
anna
Guest

Racism is one stem of the ills of society people hate on color, size, got money(TRUMP) don’t have money, look good, look bad, sick, well, educated, not educated the enemy of our souls hates us and will use whatever doesn’t matter. Unless Yahuwah builds the house the builder builds for not. Success on this side of eternity is money and stuff, position so on. You brought nothing into this world and will take nothing out don’t show up to Jesus a spiritual hobo.Peace

Yehudah Finkelstein
Guest

Stop LARPing as a Wagnerian Viking, Spencer. This is not one of your opera productions of Das Ring Des Nibelungen at the Bayerische Staatsoper.

We need an American Nationalism that appeals to Normies with stuff like Norman Rockwell and Irving Berlin Christmas songs. There is nothing more Christmas than Irvng Berlin.

Alex Mancer
Guest
Normal people who work retail in the holiday season can’t wait for it to be over and for Irving Berlin to be shut off. This kind of stupid saccharine shit is unappealing to everyone except children and those bourgeois individuals who don’t have to hear it all day every day for two months a year. Appealing to a large audience absolutely cannot mean embracing the most cloying garbage our culture pumps out. No one under forty and with half a brain sees Norman Rockwell or Bing Crosby’s Christmas albums as anything relevant; rather, they come off at best as hopelessly… Read more »
SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member

I appreciate the sentiment, however boldly it was phrased… I hope you will get to find some quietude and familial love on Christmas amid the cacophony and Chinese-made crap.

SorenSchwarzwald
Plus Member

Bro…

Based_WHITE_Man
Guest

Well written, Mr. Spencer! I admired your analysis of Ritual and the War on Christmas debacle. When I first heard this years ago (in my leftist phase) I thought it was paranoid screeching, but now I realize it was more misdirection than reckless fear. There really is a war of sorts, no doubt spear-headed by the (((Cabal)))!